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  • 3 Rules For Collecting Paintings

    Art collecting is easier than most people think. Here are 3 rules you should follow if you want to try your hand at it. By Anastasiia S. Kirpalov , MA Art History, Modern & Contemporary Art Art collecting as a hobby is usually associated with wealthy dynasties and tycoons who keep their capital safely invested in expensive art. However, as the art market keeps growing, it becomes more democratic and beginner-friendly. Today, every art lover can afford to keep a collection, limited only by their finances and storage space. While some collectors see art as a safe investment, others insist on collecting out of sheer love. Read on to learn more about art collecting and its basic rules when it comes to paintings.   1. The First Rule of Collecting Paintings: Educate Yourself! Paintings are perhaps the most popular and obvious domain of art collecting. No matter what your final goal is, collecting is an intellectual hobby that involves knowledge and expertise. Some collectors hire art historians and curators to manage their paintings for them. Although such help can be useful when you are trying to keep track of a vast and expensive collection, it also removes part of the fun that comes with this hobby.   To become a good art collector, you have to educate yourself on the history of art, materials, and techniques. For instance, if you decide to collect 19th-century art, you should get familiar with the mindset of artists and the public of the time to get insights into the creative process and reception of the works. Learning the way of thinking of your artist, their biography, and their significant features will help you narrow your focus and avoid getting fooled by art forgers. Moreover, interacting with your collection and learning its secrets is the most exciting part: take your time to examine the brushwork, the paint layers, and the contours peeking from underneath, as they can teach you a lot. Ladybug, by Joan Mitchell, 1957. Source: MoMA, New York 2. Recognize an Investment Piece If you plan to profit from your collection at some point in the future, you may want to turn your attention to safer pieces of art, rather than those made by young, unknown artists. Many art collectors, especially those who can afford to spend millions on their collections, see art as a prospective financial investment . Therefore, they buy the so-called ‘blue chip’ art—safe and well-researched objects made by established artists, which would inevitably increase in value year after year. A trendy contemporary artist might fall out of favor in a year, but a Picasso or Pollock would still be desirable. Of course, miracles happen. Sometimes forgotten artists get a posthumous rediscovery, with their work’s prices unexpectedly soaring. In 2022, archivists discovered a previously unknown series of watercolors by Hilma af Klint in Switzerland. The owner, Swiss poet Albert Steffen, did not pay much attention to them, yet after the great revival of Hilma af Klint’s oeuvre, a private museum in the US bought the collection for an undisclosed, yet generous, price. Still, a successful collector should not count on miracles. Good investments require knowledge, effort, and calculations.   Typically, a good art investment would be a work made by a well-known and well-researched artist, of stable quality and with enough data behind it to prove its authenticity. One medium-sized work is better than a dozen sketches. Larger works are harder to handle, and thus less likely to find a new owner quickly. The Blue Room, by Suzanne Valadon. 1923. Source: Centre Pompidou 3. If you plan to profit from your collection at some point in the future, you may want to turn your attention to safer pieces of art, rather than those made by young, unknown artists. Many art collectors, especially those who can afford to spend millions on their collections, see art as a prospective financial investment . Therefore, they buy the so-called ‘blue chip’ art—safe and well-researched objects made by established artists, which would inevitably increase in value year after year. A trendy contemporary artist might fall out of favor in a year, but a Picasso or Pollock would still be desirable. Of course, miracles happen. Sometimes forgotten artists get a posthumous rediscovery, with their work’s prices unexpectedly soaring. In 2022, archivists discovered a previously unknown series of watercolors by Hilma af Klint in Switzerland. The owner, Swiss poet Albert Steffen, did not pay much attention to them, yet after the great revival of Hilma af Klint’s oeuvre, a private museum in the US bought the collection for an undisclosed, yet generous, price. Still, a successful collector should not count on miracles. Good investments require knowledge, effort, and calculations.   Typically, a good art investment would be a work made by a well-known and well-researched artist, of stable quality and with enough data behind it to prove its authenticity. One medium-sized work is better than a dozen sketches. Larger works are harder to handle, and thus less likely to find a new owner quickly. I hope you have enjoyed the post. Feel free to comment.

  • ‘Art gives you something to hold on to’: Dutch museum launches dementia-friendly programme

    A series of events will use the museum’s collection to spark memories and emotions An art museum in the Netherlands, the Kunstmuseum Den Haag, launched a program called "Kunstconnectie" (Art Connection) specifically for people with dementia and their caregivers. The program uses art to connect people with dementia and their caregivers by sparking conversation and emotions. Here are the key points: Trained museum guides lead tours on the last Friday of each month. Each tour focuses on a different theme, like color or nature. The goal is to use art to create a shared experience for people with dementia and their caregivers. This program is part of a larger effort in the Netherlands to improve care for people with dementia. Article published by The Art Newspaper.

  • 12 important Women of Abstract Expressionism

    The first names that come to mind in Abstract Expressionism—Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, and the like—may all be men, but women artists also played a crucial role in the internationally-renown movement. It’s time for some long-overdue recognition of other Ab Ex greats. In preparation for the exhibition, Chanzit cast a wide net, taking a look at the work of over 100 women, about 40 of whom she says would have been a good fit for the final show and are featured in the catalogue. What she found was that artists were important practitioners of Abstract Expressionism—the first internationally-influential American art movement—on both coasts, but that the Bay Area’s female painters were more accepted and given more opportunities than their New York counterparts.   Elaine de Kooning  (1918–1989) Elaine de Kooning signed her paintings with her initials so that viewers wouldn’t judge her for being a woman. Like Abbott, she was a member of the exclusive “the Club.” De Kooning also worked as an art critic and teacher, and was elected to the National Academy of Design in 1985. She was also married to Willem, who got a bit more of the spotlight. Judith Godwin  (1930–) Judith Godwin studied under Hofmann, Will Barnet, and  Vaclav Vytlacil , creating work inspired by Modern dance. Godwin, who shared a studio with  Franz Kline , was influenced by Zen Buddhism, which she was introduced to by her friend, Japanese painter  Kenzo Okada . She showed with Stable Gallery and Betty Parsons, and a had a 2010 solo show at  Spanierman Modern  featured in  artnet Magazine  at the time. Joan Marter’s essay, “Missing in Action: Abstract Expressionist Women,” is an excellent starting point as it enumerates some of the many obstacles faced by women in this movement. From sexism among the male artists drinking at the Cedar Bar to the insulting nature of Clement Greenberg’s assessment of art by women as decorative and overly polished, women were embattled by literal and rhetorical boys’ clubs. Women artists were rarely represented by dealers, galleries, or solo shows as their careers were developing, and even when they were, those contributions were overlooked by early historians of Abstract Expressionism. Marter also charts the few exhibition opportunities that were open to women abstractionists in the 1950s including the  Ninth Street Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture  in 1951 and the annual exhibitions at the Stable Gallery from 1953 to 1957. These early displays featured work by men and women—paintings by Grace Hartigan and Helen Frankenthaler hung alongside those by Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, and others—and the selection committee included Perle Fine, Joan Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning. These shows offered exposure and leadership opportunities for women artists. They provide evidence of women’s participation as makers and curators in the Abstract Expressionist movement from an early moment, which makes the neglect that such women have suffered ever since all the more egregious.

  • "Exploring the Impact of One of My Favorite Artists"

    Brice Marden Brice Marden is best known for gestural abstraction which means paint is spontaneously dribbled, splashed or smeared onto the canvas rather than carefully applied. Marden's inspiration was Japanese calligraphy and Chinese poetry. The artist admired calligraphy as abstract art. However abstract Marden's paintings are, it's soul derives from specific sources unique to the artists personal experiences. " I like to define a painting in spiritual terms. painting is about getting toward something I don't know about. The way I get there is visual. Marden sees every stroke, every line as crucial. The painting talks to you, you talk to the painting and it emerges. By trying to truly express yourself and your response to the world, you create true expression. Here are some etchings that Marden created called the Cold Mountain Paintings. These images were done around 1985.

  • Discover the Magic of Local Artisans:

    Are you looking to add a touch of uniqueness and creativity to your home or office space? Look no further than the vibrant world of local artisans. These talented individuals bring a fresh perspective and a unique flair to the art scene, offering a diverse range of creative pieces that can breathe new life into your decor. Dive into the realm of local artistry and uncover how these artisans can influence your space with their exceptional art-making skills. Embracing the Beauty of Abstract Art Local artisans often specialize in creating captivating abstract art pieces that add a contemporary and eclectic touch to any environment. Their expressive use of colors, shapes, and textures can evoke emotions and spark conversations, making abstract art a powerful focal point in your decor. Whether you're drawn to bold, dynamic compositions or subtle, minimalist designs, local artisans have the creative prowess to tailor their work to suit your personal style and preferences. Exploring the World of Digital Expressive Artwork In a digitally-driven age, many local artisans have embraced technology to craft innovative digital expressive artwork. These dynamic pieces blend traditional art techniques with modern digital tools, resulting in visually stunning creations that push the boundaries of artistic expression. With digital art, you can showcase unique, one-of-a-kind pieces that resonate with the tech-savvy aesthetic of contemporary design. Infusing Original Collage and Mixed Media Artwork Local artisans also excel in the realm of original collage and mixed media artwork, where traditional and unconventional materials converge to form captivating visual narratives. These layered creations incorporate elements such as paper, fabric, found objects, and paint, resulting in textured and multidimensional pieces that add depth and intrigue to your decor. By incorporating original collage and mixed media artwork into your space, you can introduce a sense of artistic eclecticism and storytelling that captivates the imagination. Elevating Your Decor with Local Artistry By supporting local artisans and incorporating their unique creations into your decor, you not only infuse your space with creative energy but also contribute to the thriving art community in your area. Local art adds a personal touch and a sense of authenticity to your surroundings, transforming a house into a home or an office into a creative sanctuary. Whether you're a seasoned art collector or a newcomer to the art world, exploring the offerings of local artisans can open up a world of possibilities for enhancing your space with originality and flair. Closing Thoughts As you embark on your journey to revitalize your decor, consider the invaluable contributions that local artisans can make to your space. Their artistic vision, craftsmanship, and passion for creating beauty can elevate your surroundings and inspire a sense of creativity and individuality. Embrace the power of local artistry and let the magic of artisanal creativity transform your space into a place of aesthetic delight and visual intrigue. In a world where creativity knows no bounds, local artisans stand out as the unsung heroes of the art scene. Their unique perspectives and exceptional skills bring a fresh and innovative approach to decor, infusing spaces with a palpable sense of creativity and originality. Explore the world of local artistry and let the talents of these artisans influence your decor in ways you never thought possible.

  • How to Fill Your Home With Abstract Art

    You don’t have to have a creative director in your job title to curate a space full of eye-catching abstract art. In fact, it’s best not to overthink it when it comes to the visual language that has no rules. Yet, it can feel overwhelming to delve in, especially when price tags can vary into the thousands The best place to start is by getting comfortable with the fact that your art and your décor don’t have to coordinate to a T, in fact, it is visually to your benefit if your art stands out. No matter what your personal style, your abstract work of choice will make a statement, as in many ways it was created to do just that. Don’t let the Matisses’, and Picassos’ scare you. Not all abstract art has to be abundant with shape and color. An easy way to integrate this mode of craft into your home is to opt for the minimal, such as a neutral canvas. Artists who focus more on simple graphics can be a good place to start. In this way, you can deliver that level of sophistication without over-stimulating the eye. If your home has a few accent colors, a great way to tie them into each other is by finding a work of abstract art that carries many of the same tones. Say you’ve gone for millennial pink details—mounting a canvas with many of the same hues will make the room feel polished and well-considered. To prevent a room from looking too busy, designate one wall in your room to art. This way you’re not weighing down your living-area by attempting too much or distracting the eye with too many places to look. I hope you have enjoyed this article on filling your home with abstract art. Check out my website for more choices of both original art and prints. marcgarrisonartist.com

  • 11 Reasons To Collect Fine Art

    1. Each work of art is original and one of a kind Each painting is a moment in time – a feeling, a thought, a hope, a dream; a treasure of an experience that I had once and will never have again. No two people have the same experience in a work of art. When I hand the painting over to you, it becomes yours. You begin creating your own moments within it – your hopes and dreams and thoughts and feelings. I start the piece, but you are the one who completes 2. I use only the highest quality materials I use only the highest caliber of canvas, paint and mixed media materials in all of my original works. All of my giclées are generated from high resolution digital images and printed on museum quality canvas material with high quality archival inks and protectant spray coating to prevent scratches and other damage. They are available on canvas wrap, stretched canvas, or 100% cotton rag archival watercolor paper. Canvas wrap is a low-cost alternative to traditional framing which allows you to decide if you want a frame for the piece or not. Each original/giclée is hand signed, with a certificate of authenticity. 3. Buy directly from the artist When you buy a piece of art from a gallery, you usually only interact with the receptionist and sales staff, or maybe the owner. You never get the chance to meet the artist, to inquire about your favorite pieces or ask what their process was in creating it. You don’t get to find out their story, save for a brochure that the gallery hands out. But when you buy art directly from me, I make myself available to you! Not only do you get to learn all about the piece you’re purchasing, you can ask questions and get to know me. Think how cool it will be to tell your friends that you’re not just a collector, but you have met the artist personally! 4. Save money by going direct Not only do you get to know the artist when you buy direct, you also save money – meaning you get more value for what you spend. There are no galleries or agents marking up the price so they can take an exorbitant commission off the top. My prices are based on the size of the piece, its complexity, the materials that I use, and how much time it takes me to research and paint. The price hasn’t been inflated each time it changes hands until it reaches you. So you save money in the long run and get personalized service directly from the artist – you really can’t beat that! 5. You are investing not only in the art, but the artist Art is such an integral part of life today – we can’t turn on our computers or phones or even step outside without hearing a beautiful song or seeing beautiful photographs. We are surrounded by paintings on our walls and colorful fashions on our clothing and an array of enjoyable sensory experiences. Each creator of these works has contributed directly to making your world more beautiful. Think about it: we don’t hesitate to spend money on food and clothing and those people that help to improve our lives. Why wouldn’t you want to invest in someone who has touched your heart and sparked your imagination? 6. My work is constantly evolving Not only does this mean that there is something for everyone in my works – be it figurative, animal, portrait, landscape, nature, abstract, or a mixture of the above – but it means that my work moves through different phases. I believe in constantly improving – and that means not only practicing what I know, but constantly experimenting and delving into new arenas. If you like a particular genre of my work, now is the time to buy the original – I might never create something like that again! 7. Recession? What recession? My business is growing … be a part of it! Froshay Fine Art has grown so much in the last several years and is more widely appreciated than ever before. Come share in my success. 8. The value of my work continues to go up As my business continues to grow, the value of my art continues to go up as well. That value will only continue to appreciate over time – this means that any pieces you purchase will become heirlooms for you to pass down to your children and grandchildren. 9. If you aren’t satisfied I will give you your money back I offer you the opportunity to try out a piece when you buy it. You have up to 30 days to change your mind about the piece. If you are not satisfied, you will be refunded the whole price in exchange for the painting returned in the exact same condition it was purchased in. How many artists and agents can you say that about? 10. Art has been scientifically proven to help you to live a longer and healthier life In a study where human guinea pigs were hooked up to a brain scanner and shown 30 different works by world-renowned artists, they found that when the viewer looked at a piece of art that they really enjoyed, blood flow increased to the brain by 10 percent (the same as looking at a loved one!) The increase in blood flow was directly related to how much the viewer enjoyed the piece. When they were shown works that the viewer thought was ugly, often times either little or no blood flow increased to the brain. Even though it may seem obvious that looking at something beautiful will make you feel good, the scientific study proved that it affects our brain even more than we previously thought. Hanging a piece of art on your wall that you love does more than just make you feel good every day (as if that benefit wasn’t enough!) If it can cause increased blood flow to your brain that helps you to think more clearly and have healthier cognitive function, then it can also improve your overall health. 11. You love beauty and want to feel the magic You love surrounding yourself with beautiful things while fulfilling and expressing your own creative self with your collection. Owning a Froshay allows you to step into this world of magic.

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